Rare photo of Comet Leonard’s disconnected gas tail wins 2022 Astronomy Photographer of the Year

3 weeks ago 12

© Gerald Rhemann/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022

Astronomy Photographer of the Year has announced the winners of its 2022 contest. The overall winner is Gerald Rhemann from Austria. His photo Disconnection Event is a rare image of a piece of Comet Leonard’s gas tail being disconnected and carried away by the solar wind.

Other than Rhemann’s impressive photo which won the overall prize and the Planets, Comets and Asteroids category, the contest has also announced winners and runner-ups in all of its categories. They kindly shared it with DIYP, so we bring you the best of the best from the 14th Astronomy Photographer of the Year.

The competition is run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich, supported by Liberty Specialty Markets, and in association with BBC Sky at Night Magazine. This year’s contest received over 3,000 entries from photographers coming from 67 countries across the globe.

This year’s winner captured his splendid Comet Leonard image in Namibia on Christmas Day 2021. Comet Leonard was the brightest comet of the year in 2021, but we won’t be able to see it from Earth again. “This award is one of the highlights of my astrophotography work,” Rhemann said. “All the effort that went into making this image a success was worth it.”

© Gerald Rhemann/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022; Overall Winner, Planets, Comets and Asteroids winner

The Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year are two fourteen-year-old boys from China. Yang Hanwen and Zhou Zezhen collaborated to capture Andromeda Galaxy: The Neighbour. It’s another stunning photo from the contest, showing one of the Milky Way’s closest and largest neighbors. Yang Hanwen said that their photo “shows how gorgeous our nearest neighbor is. Zhou Zezhen added that they feel honored, and wanted to thank the judges for choosing their photo. “One of the main functions of astrophotography is to attract more people to fall in love with astronomy by showing the beauty of the Universe,” he concluded.

© Yang Hanwen and Zhou Zezhen/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022

Like every year, Astronomy Photographer of the Year selects the overall winner and winners in two special categories. In addition to them, the contest chooses a winner in each of these nine categories:

  • Skyscapes: Landscape and cityscape images of twilight and the night sky featuring the Milky Way, star trails, meteor showers, comets, conjunctions, constellation rises, halos and noctilucent clouds alongside elements of earthly scenery.
  • Aurorae: Photographs featuring auroral activity.
  • People and Space:Photographs of the night sky including people or a human-interest element.
  • Our Sun: Solar images including transits and solar eclipses.
  • Our Moon: Lunar images including occultation of planets and lunar eclipses.
  • Planets, Comets and Asteroids: Everything else in our solar system, including planets and their satellites, comets, asteroids and other forms of zodiacal debris.
  • Stars and Nebulae: Deep space objects within the Milky Way galaxy, including stars, star clusters, supernova remnants, nebulae and other intergalactic phenomena.
  • Galaxies: Deep space objects beyond the Milky Way galaxy, including galaxies, galaxy clusters, and stellar associations.
  • Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year: Pictures taken by budding astronomers under the age of 16 years old.

The overall and category winners, as well as runner-ups, will be exhibited from 17 September at the National Maritime Museum in London. But if you’re far from London like me, you can still enjoy the digital version of these splendid photos below.

Skyscapes

© Zihui Hu/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Abhijit Patil/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Filip Hrebenda/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Aurorae

© Fred Bailey/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Fred Bailey/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Alexander Stepanenko/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

People and Space

© Andrew McCarthy/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Mihail Minkov/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Hannah Rochford/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Our Sun

© Soumyadeep Mukherjee/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Stuart Green/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Miguel Claro/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Our Moon

© Martin Lewis/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Andrea Vanoni/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Noah Kujawski/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Planets, Comets and Asteroids

© Damian Peach/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Lionel Majzik/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Stars and Nebulae

© Weitang Liang/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Martin Cohen/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Péter Feltóti/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Galaxies

© Utkarsh Mishra, Michael Petrasko, Muir Evenden/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Mark Hanson, Mike Selby/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Runner Up

© Mathew Ludgate/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year

© Peter Szabo, Highly Commended/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

© Saahil Sinha/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Highly Commended

© Julian Shapiro/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022,Highly Commended

The Annie Maunder Prize for Digital Innovation

© Pauline Woolley, using open source data from Solar Dynamic Observatory/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

The Sir Patrick Moore Prize for Best Newcomer

© Lun Deng/Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2022, Winner

Read Entire Article